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THE BLASTERS

AMERICAN MUSIC & TROUBLE BOUND (2CD)

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Floating World (FLOATM6130 )

AMERICAN MUSIC American Music, Real Rock Drive, Barefoot Rock, I Don't Want To, Marie Marie, I Wish You Would, She Ain't Got The Beat and 12 more.

TROUBLE BOUND Red Rose, Trouble Bound, Long White Cadillac, Cryin' For My Baby, I'm Shakin', Blues Shadows, Help You Dream and 10 more.

‘American Music' is a reissue of the 1980 album made for Ronny Weiser's legendary rockabilly label Rollin' Rock. I loved it then and still do. This is the classic line-up of Phil Alvin's vocals and rhythm guitar, brother Dave Alvin pulling out all the stops on lead guitar, Bill Bateman on drums, John Bazz on bass and Gene Taylor rattling the piano keys. Then it's head down, all-out rockin' - taking every song by the throat and whanging it out like there's no tomorrow. Dave Alvin wrote about half the songs and they have the authentic sound of the earliest days of rockabilly-just like they were born in Tennessee in 1952. It's full on rock and roll that never lets up and as soon as one thrilling blast of a song finishes, another one comes roaring along. It's got to be one of the best debut albums ever.

‘Trouble Bound' is a recording of a live 2002 gig at The House Of Blues in Los Angeles. The band crashes into seventeen white hot numbers penned by Dave Alvin or great stars like Harold Burrage, Billy Boy Arnold and Sonny Burgess but it's the Alvin stuff that wins - especially the well honed killers like Long White Cadillac, Common Man, Dark Night and Hollywood Bed. Alvin's guitar is superb too. Listen to the power chords and clanging fills on Long White Cadillac and the great blues effects he cranks out on Cryin' For My Baby and the stratospheric runs on Blue Shadows and Johnny Watson's bootin' blues Too Tired. And if you want to know how rock guitar should be played, look no further than his blistering performance on Dark Night.

American Music/Trouble Bound is one CD set your ears were made for. Don't let it slip by.

 

Review Date: March 2012

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